City honda turbo


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I LOVE small cars. Specifically, I love the small cars from Japan and Europe. Part of it is their inherent sensibility and efficiency, part of it is the ingenious design and intelligent engineering often required to achieve their level of packaging. A big part of it, however, is just that I love them. Especially if they’re fun. One of my absolute favorite small cars ever is the original Honda City. Another one that I’ve recently become interested in is the Mazda Chantez.

The original Honda City came into the world in 1981. It was a subcompact hatchback intended for the JDM market. Powered by a 1.2-liter inline-4, it was not at all a kei car, although it was intended to be a small and efficient runabout. Small it may be, but the tall-design of its cabin allowed ample room to comfortably (or at least reasonably) seat four passengers. See, clever packaging. The cleverness continues out back in the trunk, as Honda designed a companion for the City, the Motocompo. This was one of the coolest features and vehicles Honda ever made. The Motocompo was a folding scooter powered by a 50c.c. engine that was designed for the City. Or vice versa, as the City’s trunk was designed to accommodate and secure the Motocompo. Available in red, blue, and yellow, it was a very attractive gadget, and along with the City, the duo was the perfect urban transport. The Motocompo was available for sale on its own, and can also be fitted into the still smaller Honda Today, another one of my favorite small cars. Curiously, the City itself ended up being much more successful sales-wise than the little trunk bike. The Motocompo was sadly discontinued after 1983, although today they likely are quite desirable. The City ended up being quite a popular car, and commercial versions were produced as well. It was attractive and funky, well-designed, -engineered, and -built, and became a little bit of a legend. This last part was due not to its sensible or even gadgety side with the Motocompo but directly tied to the inception of Mugen, what was to become Honda’s racing partner.

Mugen was started by Honda founder Soichiro Honda’s son, Hirotoshi, in the ‘70s. When the City came out and became a popular vehicle, Hirotoshi did what John Cooper did to the Mini, sporty-fy it. He added a turbocharger to the engine that bumped output to 100hp and created a one-make racing series that became quite popular. The result so impressed Honda, it was put into production as the City Turbo starting in '82. This was the hot one, and among Honda enthusiasts, the City Turbo is a much beloved and prized vehicle. Further development led to the City Turbo II, which gained an intercooler as well as blistered fenders and a more menacing look reminiscent of the racing version. Thanks to the squat and hunkered-down appearance due to those fenders, it was also dubbed the Bulldog. Using the same body components on the Bulldog, Honda even released a limited production convertible version of the City, the Cabriolet, in 1984. Designed by Pininfarina, the Cabriolet was marked by the “basket handle” roll-bar found on many other compact convertibles in the period, such as the Peugeot 205, Fiat Ritmo/Strada, and VW Golf convertibles. Over its life, the City clearly saw much development and popularity. It has become one of the most iconic JDM Honda vehicles from the 1980s, and is on its way to become a bona fide classic one day. The Turbo is also one of the very very few turbocharged Honda vehicles. I’ve loved this car since I was a kid. Like many cars in the '80s, I came to know this car thanks to Tamiya, who made no fewer than four 1/24 scale plastic model kits of the original Honda City. There was even a 1/12 scale R/C version, Willy’s Wheeler, that I coveted but never got to own. I was, however, fortunate enough to have ridden in a City Cabriolet when my mom took me to Japan when I was a kid. A clerk in one of the hotels we stayed at was Chinese and happened to own a turquoise City Cabriolet. He took us out for a ride in a rainy Japanese night, a real cool guy, and I had a really good time riding shotgun. I still have photos of it somewhere. As I said, the City enjoys many fans among those in the know. I’ve even occasionally found ones for sale in Canada. Maybe one day, I’ll be lucky enough to drive, or even own, one. I want the Bulldog.

The other old small Japanese car that I love is the Mazda Chantez. Bear with me. The Chantez is the last kei car that Mazda developed in-house. It came to market in 1972 powered by a 360c.c. V-twin. Like most kei cars from that time, it was a pretty barren affair. Nothing too sophisticated or innovative, just a small, basic, inexpensive car. For instance, that V2, it was a 2-stroke engine. The difference with the Chantez, however, was that it was originally intended to be powered by a rotary engine, the single-rotor 3A. The prototype 3A displaced 360c.c, which was the upper limit of engine displacement allowed for kei cars at the time. Not coincidentally, many kei cars, including Mazda’s own R360 and Carol 360, had 360c.c. engines. The 3A, however, put out 35hp, a much higher output than any other contemporary kei cars. A “Rotary Carol” powered by the 3A was built for testing, and the engine was intended to go into the Chantez, Mazda’s newest kei car. This engine would certainly put the Chantez ahead of its competition, not to mention making it the raciest and most interesting kei car along with the Suzuki Fronte. This struck fear in other Japanese manufacturers, however, and they lobbied against the rotary 3A being offered in a kei car. Being a rotary engine, which makes three combustion cycles per revolution, they complained that the displacement of the 3A should be classified higher than 360c.c. and therefore not be allowed to power a kei car. In fact, such logic has often led Mazda’s rotary engines to be classified at twice their displacement sizes. The competition won, the 3A was never offered on the Chantez nor put into production. The production Chantez was instead powered by a conventional engine, and Mazda never developed kei cars on their own since then. The Chantez could’ve been so cool had the other manufactures not whined. Not only would it make an interesting addition to Mazda’s list of rotary vehicles, all of which have become cult favorites, it would’ve been one of the most coolest kei cars in history.

Fortunately, someone came to the rescue: Isami Amemiya, the famed rotary tuner. Amemiya’s shop, RE雨宮, is perhaps the king (and wildest) of rotary tuners. Not only have they been continuously campaigning an FD3S RX-7 (powered by a 3-rotary 20B) in JGTC (now Super GT) since 1995 as well as D1GP, they have churned out some of the wildest, most radically tuned rotary Mazdas in the world. Back in the '70s, Amemiya decided to stuff a 12A turbo into his Chantez. The 12A, in stock form, put out 165hp, and the Chantez, in stock form, weighed just over 1000lbs. The result of a 12A turbo-powered Chantez? Accord to Amemiya-san, he once challenged and terrorized a Porsche 930 Turbo with it. In fact, rumor has it that this Chantez made enough appearances to be a known character in the not-so-legal street racing world at the time. It may be ugly, but it certainly was a cool little car.

While these two as well as most other sub-small Japanese cars were never sold in the US, nowadays small cars are becoming more and more popular here. The very excellent Honda Fit and Mazda2 represent two of the best examples, the former the spiritual descendent of the City, the latter I’m very eager to own especially once it becomes equipped with Mazda’s new SKY engine. Small cars, especially hatchbacks, are great. They’re sensible, practical, smart, and responsible. And as the Chantez and City show, they’re far from boring.

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Project Honda City Turbo II – Engine refresh

This Honda City Turbo II seems to be a hit with you guys, and it just goes to show that it’s not all about big horsepower and expensive cars. In the previous post you saw the engine being removed and torn down in preparation for a refresh. While the whole engine won’t be receiving a rebuild, the head will be getting some special attention, along with a fresh set of seals and gaskets. Oh, and a nice new turbo! On we go with another very detailed installment…

Part 1: IntroductionPart 2: Teardown

Words by Ryan Lewis.

Max boosties arrived. Looking good. The machining is nicely done. They even honed the mounting flange on our old exhaust housing as well. Brand new core and compressor housing, with our original actuator and exhaust housing machined to suit the larger turbine wheel.

Next up we started the head rebuild. We’re replacing valve stem seals, cam seal, bunch of other seals, gaskets and washers and the thermostat. The head, rocker assembly and camshaft will all go off for hydroblasting.

 

First thing to remove is the rocker arm assembly. 10 easily accessible bolts hold it down.

Despite all the grit in this engine the wipe surfaces look really good.

Here’s the head on the bench sans rocker assembly. Camshaft is next. The only thing holding it in is the cam angle sensor and thermostat housing which are combined into one bulky unit.

No problems with cam lobes.

Journals for the cam are spot on. Now we’re down to the valve assemblies.

This illustration relates to Honda B-series engines, but it’s near identical to the City Turbo. If you’ve never removed valves before this photo should help you to understand the procedure as outlined below.

I borrowed photos from another head rebuild thread to help explain. This is a close-up shot of the valve assembly. Those little half-circle ‘clips’ are the valve keepers. They jam in between the valve stem and the spring retainer so that the assembly works in unison. Those little keepers are what we need to remove in order to separate the assembly.

There’s a couple of different valve removal tools out there. If you’re gonna do this with the head out of the car, get one of these g-clamp style devices. With this type of tool you can wind the valve spring down and access the keepers before you release the spring tension. Obviously it’ll only work if you have the head on a bench so don’t buy this type if you want to do stem seals with the head still in the car.

One side of the clamp sits on the spring retainer …

… while the other side sits on the face of the valve.

As you wind the clamp closed, the spring compresses and the valve keepers pop out. Use a telescopic magnet or a similar to catch them.

Here’s what it looks like with the keepers removed from the middle of the spring retainer.

Take off the retainer and here are the springs (inner spring and outer spring).

Slide off the springs and there’s your valve stem seal and the valve stem itself. Push down on the valve stem and pull the valve face from the combustion chamber side. The valve will slide through the valve guide and out of the head.

Eventually your head will look like this with all valves removed. Note that our City Turbo head has a third perforated ‘valve face’ in each chamber. There’s a better picture of one above. In actual fact that isn’t a valve face at all, it’s a fixed cup that doesn’t move. This is Honda’s CVCC system.

Honda CVCC engines have normal inlet and exhaust valves, plus an extra, smaller ‘CVCC’ inlet valve. There are three butterflies in the City Turbo throttle body, the smallest one houses a fifth injector that leads to a separate set of intake runners. These runners provide a relatively rich air–fuel mixture to a ‘prechamber’ under the CVCC valve. This chamber also houses the spark plug.

While this is happening, a leaner than normal air–fuel charge, not easily ignited by the spark plug alone, is drawn into the regular cylinder combustion chamber through the main inlet valve. The volume in the prechamber, near the spark plug, is contained by the small perforated cup. Upon ignition, flame fronts emerge from the perforations and ignite the remainder of the air–fuel charge.

This allows stable running, yet complete combustion of fuel, thus reducing carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions. This method allows CVCC engines to burn less fuel more efficiently without the use of an exhaust gas recirculation valve or a catalytic convertor, although ours is late-model CVCC-II motor with a cat converter added to further reduce emissions.

 

So, we have new stem seals for these little CVCC valves as well. To remove them we can’t use the clamp tool as there’s no access to the valve face. There’s a threaded nut locking them down which we can remove, but the rest of the process is delicate. We’ll cover that when we get to it another day.

 

Stem seals all exposed and ready to be removed.

 

A set of pliers had to do in the absence of a proper stem seal removal tool .

Close up of the naked valve guides waiting for new seals. Thankfully they’re in great condition, no rattling of valves in guides at all. Every second spring seat has left a pattern like this one, but the ones with the pattern aren’t all exhaust or all intake so that’s interesting.

Here are our spring seats, springs and retainers awaiting clean up.

And our valves which will get a once over.

Overnight parts from New Zealand: air filter, thermostat, sump gasket and alternator belt.

The other bloke rebuilding this car with me is a stickler for cleanliness. He loves to make dirty things look clean again.

 

Here’s a before photo of …

 

… the green bar on the right, which braces the shifter to the gearbox. Good as new.

 

And we’re back! Head, rocker assembly, camshaft and CVCC valves arrived at work.

Apparently this was a real prick of a job. For the bargain price we paid, I couldn’t be happier.

 

Best thing about it is that old mate removed the CVCC valves for us. We’ll get the valve stem seals swapped and fit these assemblies with new o-rings and copper washers ASAP!

The time lapse video below isn’t as action packed as I’d hoped, especially because the GoPro ran out of battery right as we started torquing the head studs. Still, check it out.

Started out with the clean, bare head.

We hadn’t been able to remove the CVCC valves before it went to be cleaned so we had to fit new seals and washers to them before we could start rebuilding.

 

That required fire.

 

 

There was so much built up carbon that we couldn’t separate the perforated cups at my place. We made a trip to Tony’s and used his propane torch.

Here’s one CVCC valve dismantled and cleaned, add a new valve stem and the valve keepers to this and you’re ready to reassemble.

Here’s a finished one with new rubber o-ring.

A new copper washer goes into the head, then the perforated cup which has to be aligned so that the hole for the spark plug lines up. This is looking down from the top of the head. Another copper washer goes on top of the cup, then that assembled valve above goes on top of that and gets locked in by a special collar nut.

This is a close up from the side of the head where the spark plug threads in looking into that perforated cup.

While the CVCC bits got a clean up I started on the regular valves.

Spring seats go first, then new valve stem seals.

I used a little bit of assembly lube on each valve stem and slid them in.

View from the top.

I was really loving this. We’ve been waiting for this stage for what feels like ages!

All done. Now for the springs and retainers.

Using the valve tool this didn’t take long at all. Wind the spring down, insert the keepers and let the tension off the spring. You can see this process fairly well in the video.

Camshaft next!

And we’re ready to torque the head down onto the block with our new head gasket in between.

Head bolts done, now onto the CVCC collar nuts.

Clean rocker assembly lubed up and ready to go.

Rocker assembly torqued! Oil pump drive fitted as well.

Big milestone here.

Covered it up with the valve cover but we’ll get back in there to adjust the valve lash before we fire it up.

Knocked in a new cam seal to finish off for the night.

I’ll skip to the chase and show you where we got to in the end. We adjusted valve lash, replaced the crank seal and rear main seal, installed the water pump, timing belt, tensioner and covers, fitted the thermostat, manifolds, fuel rail, throttle body and turbo. We’re not far off now. We rigged up the GoPro again but it ran out of battery very early on.

What we did get is a boring video showing not much of the valve adjustment process.You need three tools to do this. Feeler gauge, flathead screwdriver and 12mm spanner. What you’re doing is setting the correct amount of space (lash) between the tappet (the threaded bit adjusted with the screwdriver) and the top of the valve stem. The gap gets tighter as heat expands the valvetrain, so there has to be enough space that the valves will still close against the head completely and seal the combustion chamber.

It helps to have three arms or a friend to do this, but regular two-armed humans can do it solo without too much extra fuss. First, back off the locking nut with your spanner, loosen the tappet with a screwdriver then slide your feeler gauge (of correct depth) between tappet and valve stem. Adjust the tappet until you can feel resistance on the feeler gauge when sliding it back and forth, then tighten the locking nut. Rotate the engine and double check the gap. If there’s still the same amount of resistance on the gauge then you’re sweet. It takes some feel to get it right. Consistency comes with practice.

I couldn’t find correct info about the adjustment sequence for our engine so I did it the slow way, one cylinder at a time. I bumped the crank around until the exhaust valve on cylinder 1 started to open then set the lash to 0.15mm on both cylinder 1 intake valves. Then onto cylinder 2, then 3, then 4, then started again at cylinder 1 with the 0.20mm feeler gauge, rotating the crank until the intake valves started to open then adjusting the exhaust valve. Repeat for the other three cylinders.

We did this using the original timing belt with my timing marks on it from disassembly. Those marks were transferred onto our new timing belt, proudly supplied by MITSUBOSHI – ‘Surprisingly JDM!™’

Before we could fit the timing belt we wanted to remove the crank girdle to replace the rear main and crank seals. Oil pump off, girdle bolts out and flywheel about to be removed after some negotiations with the engine stand.

Here we go. The journals all look good. Bearings are fine too. The seals have been removed from both ends of the crank in this photo and there’s some gasket stripper doing its thing to eat away the last bits of goopy gasket cement.

To avoid pinching the new seals we torqued the crank girdle down first.

All cleaned up and awaiting new rear main seal. We got the seal most of the way in but will have to finish it off once we get the engine off the stand.

New crank seal went into its new home with no trouble. I forgot to take photos of the new seals installed.

Timing belt, tensioner and water pump done!

New thermostat installed.

Fresh gasket for the manifolds/head.

Intake and exhaust manifolds bolted up and turbo installed! This was a cool milestone to reach. Looks awesome with the turbo hanging off the side.

Oil lines plumbed to the turbo, fuel rail and throttle body all fitted.

Timing belt covers and crank pulley also fitted. Feels so good to have less loose parts lying around and an engine looking like an engine again. More to come soon.

That’s all for now, folks. The next update will show the last of the engine ancillaries being fitted so it can be installed into the car.

from your own site.

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honda city turbo | Tumblr

I LOVE small cars. Specifically, I love the small cars from Japan and Europe. Part of it is their inherent sensibility and efficiency, part of it is the ingenious design and intelligent engineering often required to achieve their level of packaging. A big part of it, however, is just that I love them. Especially if they’re fun. One of my absolute favorite small cars ever is the original Honda City. Another one that I’ve recently become interested in is the Mazda Chantez.

The original Honda City came into the world in 1981. It was a subcompact hatchback intended for the JDM market. Powered by a 1.2-liter inline-4, it was not at all a kei car, although it was intended to be a small and efficient runabout. Small it may be, but the tall-design of its cabin allowed ample room to comfortably (or at least reasonably) seat four passengers. See, clever packaging. The cleverness continues out back in the trunk, as Honda designed a companion for the City, the Motocompo. This was one of the coolest features and vehicles Honda ever made. The Motocompo was a folding scooter powered by a 50c.c. engine that was designed for the City. Or vice versa, as the City’s trunk was designed to accommodate and secure the Motocompo. Available in red, blue, and yellow, it was a very attractive gadget, and along with the City, the duo was the perfect urban transport. The Motocompo was available for sale on its own, and can also be fitted into the still smaller Honda Today, another one of my favorite small cars. Curiously, the City itself ended up being much more successful sales-wise than the little trunk bike. The Motocompo was sadly discontinued after 1983, although today they likely are quite desirable. The City ended up being quite a popular car, and commercial versions were produced as well. It was attractive and funky, well-designed, -engineered, and -built, and became a little bit of a legend. This last part was due not to its sensible or even gadgety side with the Motocompo but directly tied to the inception of Mugen, what was to become Honda’s racing partner.

Mugen was started by Honda founder Soichiro Honda’s son, Hirotoshi, in the ‘70s. When the City came out and became a popular vehicle, Hirotoshi did what John Cooper did to the Mini, sporty-fy it. He added a turbocharger to the engine that bumped output to 100hp and created a one-make racing series that became quite popular. The result so impressed Honda, it was put into production as the City Turbo starting in '82. This was the hot one, and among Honda enthusiasts, the City Turbo is a much beloved and prized vehicle. Further development led to the City Turbo II, which gained an intercooler as well as blistered fenders and a more menacing look reminiscent of the racing version. Thanks to the squat and hunkered-down appearance due to those fenders, it was also dubbed the Bulldog. Using the same body components on the Bulldog, Honda even released a limited production convertible version of the City, the Cabriolet, in 1984. Designed by Pininfarina, the Cabriolet was marked by the “basket handle” roll-bar found on many other compact convertibles in the period, such as the Peugeot 205, Fiat Ritmo/Strada, and VW Golf convertibles. Over its life, the City clearly saw much development and popularity. It has become one of the most iconic JDM Honda vehicles from the 1980s, and is on its way to become a bona fide classic one day. The Turbo is also one of the very very few turbocharged Honda vehicles. I’ve loved this car since I was a kid. Like many cars in the '80s, I came to know this car thanks to Tamiya, who made no fewer than four 1/24 scale plastic model kits of the original Honda City. There was even a 1/12 scale R/C version, Willy’s Wheeler, that I coveted but never got to own. I was, however, fortunate enough to have ridden in a City Cabriolet when my mom took me to Japan when I was a kid. A clerk in one of the hotels we stayed at was Chinese and happened to own a turquoise City Cabriolet. He took us out for a ride in a rainy Japanese night, a real cool guy, and I had a really good time riding shotgun. I still have photos of it somewhere. As I said, the City enjoys many fans among those in the know. I’ve even occasionally found ones for sale in Canada. Maybe one day, I’ll be lucky enough to drive, or even own, one. I want the Bulldog.

The other old small Japanese car that I love is the Mazda Chantez. Bear with me. The Chantez is the last kei car that Mazda developed in-house. It came to market in 1972 powered by a 360c.c. V-twin. Like most kei cars from that time, it was a pretty barren affair. Nothing too sophisticated or innovative, just a small, basic, inexpensive car. For instance, that V2, it was a 2-stroke engine. The difference with the Chantez, however, was that it was originally intended to be powered by a rotary engine, the single-rotor 3A. The prototype 3A displaced 360c.c, which was the upper limit of engine displacement allowed for kei cars at the time. Not coincidentally, many kei cars, including Mazda’s own R360 and Carol 360, had 360c.c. engines. The 3A, however, put out 35hp, a much higher output than any other contemporary kei cars. A “Rotary Carol” powered by the 3A was built for testing, and the engine was intended to go into the Chantez, Mazda’s newest kei car. This engine would certainly put the Chantez ahead of its competition, not to mention making it the raciest and most interesting kei car along with the Suzuki Fronte. This struck fear in other Japanese manufacturers, however, and they lobbied against the rotary 3A being offered in a kei car. Being a rotary engine, which makes three combustion cycles per revolution, they complained that the displacement of the 3A should be classified higher than 360c.c. and therefore not be allowed to power a kei car. In fact, such logic has often led Mazda’s rotary engines to be classified at twice their displacement sizes. The competition won, the 3A was never offered on the Chantez nor put into production. The production Chantez was instead powered by a conventional engine, and Mazda never developed kei cars on their own since then. The Chantez could’ve been so cool had the other manufactures not whined. Not only would it make an interesting addition to Mazda’s list of rotary vehicles, all of which have become cult favorites, it would’ve been one of the most coolest kei cars in history.

Fortunately, someone came to the rescue: Isami Amemiya, the famed rotary tuner. Amemiya’s shop, RE雨宮, is perhaps the king (and wildest) of rotary tuners. Not only have they been continuously campaigning an FD3S RX-7 (powered by a 3-rotary 20B) in JGTC (now Super GT) since 1995 as well as D1GP, they have churned out some of the wildest, most radically tuned rotary Mazdas in the world. Back in the '70s, Amemiya decided to stuff a 12A turbo into his Chantez. The 12A, in stock form, put out 165hp, and the Chantez, in stock form, weighed just over 1000lbs. The result of a 12A turbo-powered Chantez? Accord to Amemiya-san, he once challenged and terrorized a Porsche 930 Turbo with it. In fact, rumor has it that this Chantez made enough appearances to be a known character in the not-so-legal street racing world at the time. It may be ugly, but it certainly was a cool little car.

While these two as well as most other sub-small Japanese cars were never sold in the US, nowadays small cars are becoming more and more popular here. The very excellent Honda Fit and Mazda2 represent two of the best examples, the former the spiritual descendent of the City, the latter I’m very eager to own especially once it becomes equipped with Mazda’s new SKY engine. Small cars, especially hatchbacks, are great. They’re sensible, practical, smart, and responsible. And as the Chantez and City show, they’re far from boring.

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honda city aa : Wikis (The Full Wiki)

City AA/FV/FAManufacturer Also called Production Class Body style(s) Layout Engine(s) Transmission(s) Wheelbase Length Width Height Curb weight
(First generation, facelift export model)
Honda
Honda Jazz
11.1981–10.1986
Subcompact
2, 4 or 5-seater 3dr hatch/van4-seater 2dr convertible
FF, transverse engine
Honda ER inline 4, 1231 cc;33 kW (44 hp) at 4500 rpm to 110 PS (81 kW) at 5500 rpm
4/5 speed manual4+3 speed Hypershift manual2 speed + overdrive Hondamatic
2220 mm
3380–3420 mm
1570–1625 mm
1460–1570 mm
640–810 kg

The first generation Honda City was a subcompact hatchback aimed mainly at the Japanese domestic market. The somewhat ungainly designed City, referred to by Honda as "Tall Boy" style[1], was also marketed abroad and was available in a number of versions. First introduced in November 1981 it carried the model codes AA for sedans, VF for vans, and FA for the widetrack Turbo II and Cabriolets.

History

[[File:|250px|thumb|left|Honda City AA, early "R" version]] While the City's layout was traditional for its category, with front-wheel drive and a transversely mounted engine, the innovative tall seating arrangement created comparable legroom to a car many times its size. This, combined with class leading fuel economy led to it being a considerable success in the Japanese domestic market. The engine was the CVCC-II 1,231 cc four-cylinder "ER", specifically designed for the City. It was also available together with the Motocompo, a special 50cc 'foldaway' scooter constructed to fit in the City's small luggage area, itself designed around the Motocompo. Originally a sportier R version, the economical E and two commercial van versions ("Pro") were introduced. In September 1982 a turbocharged version of the Honda ER engine was added to the lineup.

Designed by Pininfarina and introduced in August 1984, a drop-top Cabriolet utilized the wider track, fenders, and bigger bumpers of the Turbo II "Bulldog", but was only normally available with the naturally aspirated 67 PS (49 kW) engine. The Cabriolet was well equipped, with a glass rear window and twelve pastel colors not available on the hatchback versions.

A March 1985 light facelift brought a new asymmetrical grille (although not for the Cabriolet) and some interior improvements. The E and E II models were replaced by the new E III, while a lower priced U model joined the lineup.[2] Naturally aspirated engines in the AA Citys also gained a new fiber-reinforced aluminum alloy connecting rods ("FRM"), a world first in series production. One month later, the R became available with the interesting Hypershift transmission, a 4-speed with an electronically controlled overdrive on 2nd, 3rd and 4th gear - in essence creating a 7-speed gearbox.

In addition to vans and convertibles, there was also an "R Manhattan Roof" version with a 10 cm taller roof. A "R Manhattan Sound" version incorporated high-quality stereo equipment (including the "Bodysonic", transmitting sound vibrations through the seat). The E-series (E, E 1, E II & EIII; "E" for economy) used higher geared transmissions and trip computers to increase gas mileage. The E III, in addition to benefitting from the FRM conrods, also had an electronically variable lean-burn engine. First generation production ended in late 1986 with the introduction of the GA type City.

City Pro (VF)

Commercial versions were called Pro in Japan, and were available with either two or five seats (Pro T/F). The Pro had to make do without brake boost (until the 1985 facelift) and transistorized ignition (lowering power by 2 hp), and were also not available with the five speed manual transmission. The bare-bones Pro also had a manual choke.

Exports

Exports of the City were only of naturally aspirated hatchback and van versions. In Europe it was renamed Honda Jazz, due to Opel having the rights to the City name after having used it on a hatchback version of the Kadett C. It was marketed in Europe from 1982 to 1986, but was generally priced too high to compete. The European Jazz was only classified as a four-seater, and offered either 45 or 56 hp depending on fuel grade. The City was also sold in Australia (in two seater 'van' form, to circumvent Australian import restrictions on passenger vehicles at the time) and New Zealand (where it was locally assembled).

City Turbo

The Honda City Turbo was a sport compact / hot hatch produced by Japanese automaker Honda between 1982 and 1986, based on the naturally aspirated Honda City AA. The City Turbo is one of a very few turbocharged Honda road cars. Other turboed Hondas include the V6 Honda Legend of the late eighties and the new turbocharged i-VTEC 2.3 L in the 2007 Acura RDX.

The City Turbo was the brainchild of Hirotoshi Honda, son of Honda founder Soichiro Honda as well as founder and owner of Mugen. In the early 1980s Mugen was a small tuning company that was beginning to make its mark producing performance parts for motorcycles and automobiles, but was yet to gain recognition outside of racing circles. When he created the City Turbo, Hirotoshi took one of Honda's most unassuming vehicles and successfully turned it into an aggressive street rocket, considered to be well ahead of its time. Impressed, Honda took Hirotoshi's idea and made a production version, introduced in September 1982. A few months earlier, Honda staffers took two City Turbos on a gruelling 10,000 km round trip of Europe, all the way from Sicily to Karasjok in the arctic north.

In November 1983, the intercooled Turbo II joined the lineup. Flared fenders, wings, sideskirts and graphics combined for a much more pugnacious appearance, making its "Bulldog" nickname very fitting. In late 1984 the original Turbo was discontinued while the Turbo II continued in production until the City was replaced in late 1986.

Engine

The City Turbo shared the 1231 cc (1.2 L) CVCC "ER" engine with its more pedestrian siblings, but the addition of a turbocharger meant that 100 PS (74 kW; 99 hp) at 5500 rpm and 15.0 kg·m (147.1 N·m; 108.5 ft·lbf) at 3000 rpm were available.[3][4] Further changes to the engine included an aluminum/titanium alloy head and a magnesium valve cover to keep the weight down. The IHI RHB51 turbocharger, developed as a joint venture between Ishikawajima Heavy Industry and Honda, was lighter and smaller than most other turbos and could run at higher rpm. When combined with Honda's PGM-F1 fuel injection and an 8-bit digital computer control unit, the end result was a very efficient engine with minimal turbo lag. 0-100 km/h was possible in 8.6 seconds.[4]

The later City Turbo II's engine featured an intercooler, a revised intake plenum, a slightly larger throttle body, a modified inlet manifold, a higher AR turbo compressor, exhaust housings, and a slightly raised (7.6:1) compression ratio. It produced 110 PS (81 kW; 108 hp) at 5500 rpm and 16.3 kg·m (159.8 N·m; 117.9 ft·lbf) at 3000 rpm.[5]

Chassis

The City Turbo's suspension was more refined than that of the ordinary City. The four-wheel independent system used progressive rate coil springs, with stabilizers at both the front and the rear. Tires were the 165/70HR12 radials, and stopping power was provided by ventilated disc brakes at the front and semi-metallic shoes at the rear. The Turbo II's flared fenders weren't just cosmetic, but were necessary to accommodate a 30 mm (20 mm in the rear) wider track and bigger 185/60 R13 tires.

Styling and Interior

The body of the Honda City Turbo was made sportier by the addition of a new air dam with fog lights and asymmetrical grille at the front and a small spoiler at the top/rear of the car. Meanwhile, a hump was added to the hood to make room for the extra equipment of the turbocharged engine. In addition to flared fenders and "Turbo II Intercooler" graphics, the Turbo II also got a bigger bump in the hood, body colored bumpers and a louver ahead of the rear wheel.

The interior appointments to the car focused both on driver involvement and comfort. A digital speedometer, surrounded by a tachometer and a boost gauge, replaced the regular analog instrument cluster, and was used until the March 1985 facelift, after which the analog assembly from the regular City was used. Form fitting, leather and moquette bucket seats were made standard as well and a special "sonic seat" was available, which responded to the audio system by a transducer sending sound and vibration to the user through the seat. An extra thick, three-spoke steering wheel was also standard Turbo fitment.

Data

Honda City 1981–1986
Version City E, U, R with A/T (AA)[6] City R, Manhattan Roof (AA) City Pro (VF) City Cabrio (FA) City Turbo (AA)[7] City Turbo II "Bulldog" (FA)[5]
Engine 1,2 Liter (1,231 cc) Inline-four, 12 valve CVCC-II SOHC
Aspiration single two-barrel Keihin carburator PGM-FI, turbocharged PGM-FI, turbocharged and intercooled
Power 63 PS (46 kW) at 5,000 rpm 67 PS (49 kW) at 5,500 rpm 61 PS (45 kW) at 5,000 rpm 67 PS (49 kW) at 5,500 rpm (AT: 63 PS) 100 PS (74 kW) at 5,500 rpm 110 PS (81 kW) at 5,500 rpm
Torque 10.0 kg·m (98 N·m; 72 lb·ft) at 3,000 rpm 10.0 kg·m (98 N·m; 72 lb·ft) at 3,500 rpm 9.8 kg·m (96 N·m; 71 lb·ft) at 3,000 rpm 10.0 kg·m (98 N·m; 72 lb·ft) at 3,500 rpm 15.0 kg·m (147 N·m; 108 lb·ft) at 3,000 rpm 16.3 kg·m (160 N·m; 118 lb·ft) at 3,000 rpm
Top Speed 141 km/h (88 mph) 150 km/h (93 mph) 135 km/h (84 mph) 150 km/h (93 mph) 179 km/h (111 mph) 175 km/h (109 mph)
Acceleration (0–100 km/h) 12,9 sec n/a 13,1 sec 13,7 sec 8,6 sec[4]n/a
Empty Weight 655–710 kg 685–710 kg 635–660 kg 800–810 kg 690–700 kg 735–745 kg
Fuel tank size 41 L
Luggage space 205 L 182 L[8]205 L
Wheelbase 2,220 mm (87.4 in)
Track (F/R) 1,370 / 1,370 mm 1,400 / 1,390 mm 1,370 / 1,370 mm 1,400 / 1,390 mm
Length/Width/ Height (mm) 3,380 / 1,570 / 1,470 (Manhattan Roof: 1,570) 3,420 / 1,625 / 1,470 3,380 / 1,570 / 1,460 3,420 / 1,625 / 1,470

References

External links

www.thefullwiki.org

honda city turbo ii | Tumblr

I LOVE small cars. Specifically, I love the small cars from Japan and Europe. Part of it is their inherent sensibility and efficiency, part of it is the ingenious design and intelligent engineering often required to achieve their level of packaging. A big part of it, however, is just that I love them. Especially if they’re fun. One of my absolute favorite small cars ever is the original Honda City. Another one that I’ve recently become interested in is the Mazda Chantez.

The original Honda City came into the world in 1981. It was a subcompact hatchback intended for the JDM market. Powered by a 1.2-liter inline-4, it was not at all a kei car, although it was intended to be a small and efficient runabout. Small it may be, but the tall-design of its cabin allowed ample room to comfortably (or at least reasonably) seat four passengers. See, clever packaging. The cleverness continues out back in the trunk, as Honda designed a companion for the City, the Motocompo. This was one of the coolest features and vehicles Honda ever made. The Motocompo was a folding scooter powered by a 50c.c. engine that was designed for the City. Or vice versa, as the City’s trunk was designed to accommodate and secure the Motocompo. Available in red, blue, and yellow, it was a very attractive gadget, and along with the City, the duo was the perfect urban transport. The Motocompo was available for sale on its own, and can also be fitted into the still smaller Honda Today, another one of my favorite small cars. Curiously, the City itself ended up being much more successful sales-wise than the little trunk bike. The Motocompo was sadly discontinued after 1983, although today they likely are quite desirable. The City ended up being quite a popular car, and commercial versions were produced as well. It was attractive and funky, well-designed, -engineered, and -built, and became a little bit of a legend. This last part was due not to its sensible or even gadgety side with the Motocompo but directly tied to the inception of Mugen, what was to become Honda’s racing partner.

Mugen was started by Honda founder Soichiro Honda’s son, Hirotoshi, in the ‘70s. When the City came out and became a popular vehicle, Hirotoshi did what John Cooper did to the Mini, sporty-fy it. He added a turbocharger to the engine that bumped output to 100hp and created a one-make racing series that became quite popular. The result so impressed Honda, it was put into production as the City Turbo starting in '82. This was the hot one, and among Honda enthusiasts, the City Turbo is a much beloved and prized vehicle. Further development led to the City Turbo II, which gained an intercooler as well as blistered fenders and a more menacing look reminiscent of the racing version. Thanks to the squat and hunkered-down appearance due to those fenders, it was also dubbed the Bulldog. Using the same body components on the Bulldog, Honda even released a limited production convertible version of the City, the Cabriolet, in 1984. Designed by Pininfarina, the Cabriolet was marked by the “basket handle” roll-bar found on many other compact convertibles in the period, such as the Peugeot 205, Fiat Ritmo/Strada, and VW Golf convertibles. Over its life, the City clearly saw much development and popularity. It has become one of the most iconic JDM Honda vehicles from the 1980s, and is on its way to become a bona fide classic one day. The Turbo is also one of the very very few turbocharged Honda vehicles. I’ve loved this car since I was a kid. Like many cars in the '80s, I came to know this car thanks to Tamiya, who made no fewer than four 1/24 scale plastic model kits of the original Honda City. There was even a 1/12 scale R/C version, Willy’s Wheeler, that I coveted but never got to own. I was, however, fortunate enough to have ridden in a City Cabriolet when my mom took me to Japan when I was a kid. A clerk in one of the hotels we stayed at was Chinese and happened to own a turquoise City Cabriolet. He took us out for a ride in a rainy Japanese night, a real cool guy, and I had a really good time riding shotgun. I still have photos of it somewhere. As I said, the City enjoys many fans among those in the know. I’ve even occasionally found ones for sale in Canada. Maybe one day, I’ll be lucky enough to drive, or even own, one. I want the Bulldog.

The other old small Japanese car that I love is the Mazda Chantez. Bear with me. The Chantez is the last kei car that Mazda developed in-house. It came to market in 1972 powered by a 360c.c. V-twin. Like most kei cars from that time, it was a pretty barren affair. Nothing too sophisticated or innovative, just a small, basic, inexpensive car. For instance, that V2, it was a 2-stroke engine. The difference with the Chantez, however, was that it was originally intended to be powered by a rotary engine, the single-rotor 3A. The prototype 3A displaced 360c.c, which was the upper limit of engine displacement allowed for kei cars at the time. Not coincidentally, many kei cars, including Mazda’s own R360 and Carol 360, had 360c.c. engines. The 3A, however, put out 35hp, a much higher output than any other contemporary kei cars. A “Rotary Carol” powered by the 3A was built for testing, and the engine was intended to go into the Chantez, Mazda’s newest kei car. This engine would certainly put the Chantez ahead of its competition, not to mention making it the raciest and most interesting kei car along with the Suzuki Fronte. This struck fear in other Japanese manufacturers, however, and they lobbied against the rotary 3A being offered in a kei car. Being a rotary engine, which makes three combustion cycles per revolution, they complained that the displacement of the 3A should be classified higher than 360c.c. and therefore not be allowed to power a kei car. In fact, such logic has often led Mazda’s rotary engines to be classified at twice their displacement sizes. The competition won, the 3A was never offered on the Chantez nor put into production. The production Chantez was instead powered by a conventional engine, and Mazda never developed kei cars on their own since then. The Chantez could’ve been so cool had the other manufactures not whined. Not only would it make an interesting addition to Mazda’s list of rotary vehicles, all of which have become cult favorites, it would’ve been one of the most coolest kei cars in history.

Fortunately, someone came to the rescue: Isami Amemiya, the famed rotary tuner. Amemiya’s shop, RE雨宮, is perhaps the king (and wildest) of rotary tuners. Not only have they been continuously campaigning an FD3S RX-7 (powered by a 3-rotary 20B) in JGTC (now Super GT) since 1995 as well as D1GP, they have churned out some of the wildest, most radically tuned rotary Mazdas in the world. Back in the '70s, Amemiya decided to stuff a 12A turbo into his Chantez. The 12A, in stock form, put out 165hp, and the Chantez, in stock form, weighed just over 1000lbs. The result of a 12A turbo-powered Chantez? Accord to Amemiya-san, he once challenged and terrorized a Porsche 930 Turbo with it. In fact, rumor has it that this Chantez made enough appearances to be a known character in the not-so-legal street racing world at the time. It may be ugly, but it certainly was a cool little car.

While these two as well as most other sub-small Japanese cars were never sold in the US, nowadays small cars are becoming more and more popular here. The very excellent Honda Fit and Mazda2 represent two of the best examples, the former the spiritual descendent of the City, the latter I’m very eager to own especially once it becomes equipped with Mazda’s new SKY engine. Small cars, especially hatchbacks, are great. They’re sensible, practical, smart, and responsible. And as the Chantez and City show, they’re far from boring.

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Honda City Turbo

Infobox Automobile

name = Honda City Turbomanufacturer = Honda*production = 1982-1987class = Sport compactlayout = FF layoutbody_style = 3-door hatchback2-door cabrioletrelated = Honda Citysimilar = Toyota StarletRenault 5 AlpineFiat Ritmo AbarthVolkswagen Golf GTI

The Honda City Turbo is a sport compact / hot hatch produced by Japanese automaker Honda between 1982 and 1987, based on the subcompact carHonda City.

The City Turbo is part of a rare breed of turbocharged Honda road engines. Other turbo Hondas include the V6 for the late eighties Honda Legend and the new turbocharged i-VTEC 2.3 L in the 2007 Acura RDX.

History

The City Turbo is the brainchild of Hirotoshi Honda, son of Honda founder Soichiro Honda as well as founder and owner of Mugen. In the early 1980s Mugen was a small tuning company that was beginning to make its mark producing performance parts for motorcycles and automobiles, but was yet to gain recognition outside of racing circles. When he created the City Turbo, Hirotoshi took one of Honda's most unassuming vehicles and turned it into an aggressive street rocket, considered to be well ahead of its time. Impressed, Honda took Hirotoshi's idea and made a production version of it.

Engine

The City Turbo had a 1237 cc (1.2 L) CVCC engine that upon the addition of a turbocharger, produced around Auto PS|110|0 at 5000 rpm and convert|16.3|kgm|Nm ftlbf|1|abbr=on at 3000 rpm. Further changes to the engine included an aluminum or titanium alloy head and a magnesium valve cover to keep the weight down. The IHI RHB51 turbocharger, developed as a joint venture between Ishikawajima Heavy Industry and Honda, was lighter and smaller than most other turbos and allowed for higher engine speeds. When combined with Honda's PGM-F1 fuel injection and an 8-bit digital computer control unit, the end result was a very efficient engine with minimal turbo lag.

uspension

The City Turbo's suspension was refined above that of the ordinary City. The four-wheel independent system used progressive rate coil springs, with stabilizers at both the front and the rear. Tires were the 165/70HR12 radials, and stopping power was provided by ventilated disc brakes at the front and semi-metallic shoes at the rear.

tyling

The body of the Honda City Turbo was made sportier by the addition of a new air dam with fog lights and asymmetrical grille at the front and a spoiler over the rear hatch. Meanwhile, a hump was added to the hood to make room for the extra equipment of the turbocharged engine. The City Turbo II, meanwhile benefited from flared fenders over both the front and rear wheels with factory graphics labeling it as an "Intercooled Turbo II."

Interior

The interior appointments to the car focused both on driver involvement and comfort. A digital speedometer, surrounded by a tachometer and a boost gauge, replaced the regular analog instrument cluster, and was used until the final run of Turbo II where the analog assembly from the regular City was used. Form fitting bucket seats were made standard as well as a special "sonic seat", which responded to the audio system by a transducer sending sound and vibration to the user through the seat.

City Turbo II

The Honda City Turbo II, known by its owners as the "Bulldog", was introduced in 1983. Changes included the above mentioned flared fenders as well as changes to the engine. The City Turbo II's engine featured an intercooler, a revised intake plenum, a slightly larger throttle body, a modified inlet manifold, a higher AR turbo compressor, exhaust housings, and a slightly raised (7.6:1) compression ratio. While the original City Turbo ended production in 1984, the City Turbo II continued on until 1987 when the Turbo model was retired. The last run of the City Turbo II had a standard analog speedometer and tachometer assembly in place of the digital speedometer of the earlier models.

A few City Turbo II vehicles were released as cabriolet models.

External links

* [http://hybrid2.honda-perf.org/news/oldcivic.html Honda City Turbo's and The Beginning of Honda Endorsed Mugen Motorsports] * [http://www.mugen-power.com/en/index.htm Mugen Official Site] * [http://www.honda.co.jp/factbook/auto/CITY/19831026/index.html Honda City Turbo II factbook] * [http://www.cityturbo.com City Turbo site]

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

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Project Honda City Turbo II – Teardown

A few weeks ago I made a post about my visit to a friends place to check out their new Honda City Turbo II build (which you can read here). I promised I’d post their build progress here if there was enough interest, and boy was there ever! There was a resounding “YES” to my query about you guys wanting to see more, so here it is. In this post I’ll be showing you the initial condition of the car and subsequent teardown in preparation for an engine re-fresh. All words and images are straight from Ryan, one of the founding members of The-Lowdown. The car is owned by Tony, a staff member over at The Motor Report, and the two of them are sharing the build. These are two of the most stand-up guys I’ve ever met, I had a ball at the Winton track day with them, and they’ve even traveled across town to lend me a hand with my garage build, so I hope you’ll check out their respective sites and have a browse around. Without further ado, it’s time to get our Honderp on…

Words and images: Ryan Lewis.

About six weeks ago a mate and I picked up a Honda City Turbo II project car. We weren’t (and still aren’t) sure what to do with it (rego/track/sell/other) but it was too good to pass up. I finished a motorbike build recently and had a hankering to rebuild something else. Plus we’ve always wanted to drive one of these things, and there’s a Motorcompo on the way from Japan so we had to pair them up. We got straight into the project so there’s already a fair bit of progress to show. I’ll start from the top.

All moved in to its new home for the next little while.

It was cheap because:

Not running. Came with a very dead turbo, no fuel pump and lots of holes where parts should be. Thankfully we also got a boot full of bits to be assembled including a head rebuilt kit and a turbo diesel Pajero turbo which was supposed to be an ‘easy replacement’ according to the last owner. Not likely. PS: COMBAX stands for ‘COMpact Blazing-combustion Axiom’. Yep.

Like I said, we got straight into it.

Boot o’ bits. Basically a bunch of driveshafts, turbo diesel Pajero turbo and other odds and ends.

More spares for the build. Looks like these radiators won’t work out so that’s on our list of things to source. The top hose fitting has broken off the original and the non-turbo City radiator doesn’t look like it’ll fit.

Derp.

The whole car is covered in filthy fingerprints and dirt. For the most part the body is in decent condition. A proper wash should bring it up to a reasonable state.

We have no idea what happened to the original rear bumper but the car came with a replacement from a convertible. City drop tops have the same wide body guards as the Turbo II but the bumpers are black plastic instead of body colour. We’ll paint it down the track.

This is by far the thing I hate the most about this car. It seems no amount of Rost Off will free up the grub screws holding it on. Angle grinder up next.

We wanted to yank the motor out straight away for a proper look at the exhaust manifold and to get started on the freshen up. The car came with a complete gasket and seal kit for the top end so we’ll be making the most of that.

Front bumper and grill removed for heaps of access. We don’t want any air con gear in the car so the condenser came out and went in the bin. Everything disconnected and labelled and rad support removed.

Engine crane time.

We dropped the oil out and got the engine onto a stand so we can work on it easily.

Dirty engine bay is dirty. Tony wasn’t havin’ it.

Degreaser and Karcher tiem.

Fair bit better. Both of us get pretty OCD at times, but this is definitely not going to be a concours rebuild. The car is a little rough so it doesn’t need to be perfect.

A friend brought over a set of CF-48s for us to use while we’ve got the City. May or may not end up on the car.

Loving having this funny car in the garage. So good to be working on a new project.

I’d never had an engine stand at home before but I’ll never go back now! So good to have it at bench height. The motor looks to be in pretty good order. We’re told that it had good, even compression across all cylinders but there’s a lot of caked on carbon under the valve cover. We don’t want to commit to a total nut and bolt overhaul so we’ll just have to see how it goes.

The A/C stuff we’ve binned so far. The car didn’t have a compressor in it when we got it. Removed a few kilos there.

Fairly sure this is the original clutch but it’s good to go back in. Pressure plate and flywheel look fine too. I should also mention that this is a low budget build. We’re trying not to get into it for more than the car will be worth when it’s finished.

Little five-speed ‘box all looks fine. Throwout bearing needs to be replaced but that’s it. City Turbo stuff isn’t exactly dime a dozen but we’ve found stuff pretty easily in New Zealand.

The interior served up a few laughs. These ‘Admit Two’ passes for Men’s Gallery have to be a couple of decades old. They were stuffed into the refrigerated compartment (!) on the dash.

We were happy to find this guy buried in the back! Original gearknob in good nick. I should’ve snapped a shot of the horrendous thing stuck to the shifter with Blu Tack when we got it. It was insta-binned. Also note the optional Citizen dash clock.

Unforgivable banana milk vinyl shift boot over the top of the standard one! Ugh.

… yep Also: DIGIDASH

So far all good! The front end has had a minor shunt at some stage (taco-shaped A/C condenser as a result) but the rad support and bumper reo are all straight. – – – – – Next up we had a win for the turbo situation with Project Honderp. How we were going to get this thing making boost again was worrying us from the day we got the car. The original ad on Gumtree said the car had a blown turbo but that it came with a replacement from a turbo diesel Pajero which would apparently work. I don’t have any great photos of the Pajero turbo, but suffice to say it is waaaaaaaay too big to be re-purposed into the City, and different to the standard turbo in almost every conceivable way, from the physical size of it to the manifold flange and exhaust flange to the compressor inlet and outlet. No good. Back to the factory turbo and the ad was somewhat understated. It is beyond dead, as this video will attest.

We did a bit of hunting for another standard turbo, which was fruitless. In our search we turned up a thread about adapting one from a turbo diesel Rodeo to the City. It’s a relatively common mod (meaning 4 or 5 guys have done it, which is a lot in City circles) but it’s a bit of a hack job. Eventually we concluded that rebuilding the turbo we had would probably work out best since a second-hander is likely to be flogged and in need of reco anyway, that’s if we could find one. So I took the turbo to Advanced Turbo Performance. After a long chat with the bloke he went to his warehouse and miraculously dug out a bootleg IHI turbo with an identical core to our little RHB51. It was a real fluke. These little cores are fairly unique in that they don’t use water cooling, just oil.

Externally the dimensions were identical. The flanges for oil feed and return were the same, even the banjo bolt thread was the same, so we dismantled both on the spot.

The new one is actually an RHB52 so the turbine and comp wheels are slightly larger than standard. Our old exhaust housing will fit with some machine work – enlarging the exhaust outlet to suit the larger turbine of the RHB52 – to create a perfect, bolt on, high-flow turbo. Score.

You can kinda see the difference in size here. 3-4mm will have to be machined out of our housing for clearance. There’s just enough material between exhaust outlet and wastegate.

We’re using the new RHB52 comp housing so that we can keep the bigger impeller and don’t have to machine our old comp cover. Outside diameter of the inlet is a match for our intake piping, inside diameter is larger for the larger impeller. The only difference is the placement of the hose fitting for the wastegate actuator but a new bit of hose takes care of that. Since we have all the bits, we’re just waiting on the exhaust housing to be acid bathed and machined and the whole thing reassembled at ATP. Since playing the waiting game sucks, I went on a trek to pick up an old high school science lab bench for my garage. That gave us space to start the engine tear down. We took both manifolds off and separated the throttle body and fuel rail. At some point a real amateur has been through this before and put it back together using all of the original gaskets. They’ve compensated for that with a liberal coating of gasket goo between every mating surface. For example, head – gasket goo – gasket – gasket goo – manifold. They would’ve gone through tubes of the stuff. Plan is to replace the head gasket and valve stem seals at least. We don’t have a manual for this car in English but we’re going to forge ahead. I haven’t done a rebuild like this before so it’s a great opportunity to learn. Hopefully it works out to be the project to do it on. It’s a shame we’ve never seen the engine running to know what its oil consumption is like. Given the hefty carbon build up under the valve cover it seems to have a bit of an issue. Could well be piston rings but we’re definitely leaving as much of the bottom end alone as possible. We just want to have some quick fun in this thing but it’s so hard to let things slide! Since my garage roof leaks some water we had to cover the engine last night. You might think you’re JDM, but you ain’t this JDM.

Here’s our valve train looking sorry for itself. Lots of caked-on carbon. We’ll get this taken care of before we start the head rebuild.

This rusty coolant stain on the back of the block sort of looked like it could’ve been from a blown head gasket. More likely the source was that vertical hose fitting on the bypass pipe where there’s more staining, but we’re doing the gasket anyway so off with its head.

Crank pulley, water pump, tensioner and timing belt removed. No nasty surprises so far. Timing belt is okay but will be replaced while we’re here.

Obviously the motor has been sitting for a while judging by the gunky water level on the impeller. The water pump has been replaced at some stage and is fine to go back on after a clean.

Little bit of shaft polishing. I’d never seen an oil pump like this. The shaft Tony is holding runs from the valve train down to the sump. There’s a worm drive sprocket in the middle of the camshaft driving the oil pump via that shaft. I’ll try to get more detailed photos later.

Head bolts out ready for lift off.

Voila. The crusty old head gasket was definitely worth changing. No sign of a blowout but the water channels were collecting rusty build-up. Carbon on the pistons wasn’t too crazy for an unopened motor from 1987. I’m still amazing by how advanced this thing was for its time. As you can see the block is open deck, and the lengths they went to for weight saving are amazing – the head is 60% titanium and the valve cover is magnesium all for the sake of lightness.

All cylinder bores are in good shape. No scoring and the original crosshatch markings still visible.

Head gasket still intact but it definitely feels like we made the right choice to replace it while we have the motor out.

Base of the head. We haven’t touched this yet.

Sump off for inspection. Ew. How about the state of that oil screen?

Diabolical. All of this grit is a bit mysterious. We got some more photos of it that I’ll dig up. I originally thought it was bearing material from the turbo that had found its way down the oil drain into the sump, but it’s not metallic, almost seems to be pulverised plastic or something. We thought it could’ve been a rogue valve stem seal, but they’re all accounted for.

Plenty more grit lining the sump.

Overall the bottom end is looking fine. No other demons hidden inside. We should be good to go after a proper clean, new rear main and crank seals and a new sump gasket.

It says TURBO, so you know it’s good.

Tony at our make-shift degreasing station.

Working on the PCV baffle from inside the valve cover.

All cleaned up.

Tony’s wonder job on the oil pump. The whole unit was dismantled into its individual components and thoroughly checked. Thankfully non of that grit made it past the oil screen.

Looks brand new!

Remember that rusty water pump? Well it came up pretty good too.

Gasket on ready for the head to be mounted.

The next thing to be tackled.

CLICK HERE for the next installment.

 

 

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